Christmas Redemption Isaiah 44 In Decemb

Christmas Redemption

Isaiah 44

In December 1853 Charles Dickens book ‘A Christmas Carol’ was published. Depicting the appalling conditions of the working people in London it preached a message of the widening gap between the rich and the poor. Dickens priced the book so that all could afford and on opening day 6,000 books were sold.
We know the story so well. The central character, Scrooge, is portrayed as a cold, bitter, selfish and greedy man. Through the ghost appearances the reader sees that this man is on the path to destruction. Christmas past shows Scrooge what he is losing; Christmas present what he has lost and Christmas future what he will lose as he dies alone and in poverty. It speaks to the heart of every man. The transformation of Scrooge to the nice man is the message that no man is beyond redemption, everyone can change and (because of Dickens Christian symbolism throughout the book) redemptive change comes by the work of Christ.
V6 This is what the LORD says – Israel’s King and Redeemer, the LORD Almighty: I am the first and I am the last; apart from me there is no God.
V22 I have swept away your offences like a cloud, your sins like the morning mist. Return to me, for I have redeemed you.’
V24 ‘This is what the LORD says – your Redeemer, who formed you in the womb:
Overlooking the city of Rio de Janeiro is the world’s largest statue constructed between 1922 and 1932, Christ the Redeemer. It is an amazing picture for the whole of Brazil’s Christian faith.
Christ the Redeemer has His arms stretched out to the whole world today and especially to the Scrooges of life. No man is beyond His reach.
Is there someone you know who needs to hear the message, “Return to me, for I have redeemed you”?
Is that someone you?
Many are in danger of losing everything and yet Christ is still holding out His hands to give everything, Himself. Let us pray that Scrooge finds redemption this Christmas.

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